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Contents:


  1. 9/11 and the Transformation of U.S. Immigration Law and Policy
  2. CRS: U.S. Immigration Policy on Temporary Admissions, January 15, - WikiLeaks
  3. Accessibility links
  4. Shortcuts to Immigration: The 'Temporary' Visa Program Is Broken

For more details, click here. I nonimmigrant admissions decreased by 8 percent between and Admissions dropped from Most of this occurred due to a decline in the two largest admission categories: tourist and business visitor admissions, which decreased by 6 percent and 22 percent, respectively. In contrast, the admissions of academic students on F visas increased by 4 percent during that time.

A number of factors caused the 15 percent drop in nonimmigrant admissions between However, the upward trend resumed after In , approximately 87 percent of nonimmigrant admissions were temporary visitors tourists and business travelers. As in previous years, temporary visitors accounted for an overwhelming majority of all arrivals. In , they represented 87 percent 46 million of all admissions to the United States see Figure 2.

Of those, Temporary workers and trainees, including H-1B "specialty occupation" workers, registered nurses, temporary agricultural workers, North American Free Trade Agreement NAFTA professional workers, treaty traders, and intracompany transferees, among others, accounted for 3.

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9/11 and the Transformation of U.S. Immigration Law and Policy

Students who came to the United States to study at academic or vocational institutes, with their family members, made up about 4 percent close to 1. Citizens from three countries — Mexico, the United Kingdom, and Japan — accounted for nearly 48 percent of all nonimmigrant admissions in Citizens from Mexico Citizens from Germany, Canada, and France accounted for another 6 million admissions, or 11 percent in total.

Brazilians 1. Nationals of these ten countries accounted for about 70 percent of the total nonimmigrant admissions.


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The overwhelming majority were tourist admissions. Nationals of Canada, Mexico, and China made up over half of all foreign academic student admissions in Citizens of Mexico , , Canada , , and China , composed 58 percent of the 1. Note: Vocational M-visa students and students' family members are not included in these figures; commuter students on F-3 visas are included. Together, the top 10 countries of origin represented 79 percent 1. Nonimmigrants from India composed almost one-third of all H-1B "specialty occupation" worker admissions in Five countries — India, Canada 18 percent or 88, , Mexico 8 percent or 37, , China 5 percent or 23, , and the United Kingdom 4 percent or 19, — accounted for 64 percent , of all H-1B admissions in Nonimmigrants from Mexico accounted for more than three-quarters of all H-2B seasonal nonagricultural worker admissions in In , citizens of Mexico 62, accounted for 78 percent of the 79, H-2B seasonal nonagricultural worker admissions includes returning H-2B workers and trainees.

Individuals from Jamaica 4, , Guatemala 2, , Canada 1, , the United Kingdom 1, , South Africa 1, , the Philippines , and El Salvador accounted for another 16 percent. Four states — California, Florida, Texas and New York— were the intended destination for over half of all nonimmigrant admissions in In , the most popular destinations for the Of the approximately 1.

Department of Homeland Security. Source: U. Department of State. In FY , 22, refugees were admitted to the U. The main countries of origin were the Democratic Republic of the Congo 35 percent , Myanmar 16 percent , Ukraine 12 percent , Bhutan 10 percent , and Eritrea 6 percent.


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According to the UN Refugee Agency , children below 18 years of age constituted about half of the refugee population in , up from 41 percent in Women constituted around 50 percent of the refugee population as well. Given the drop in the number of refugees admitted, there has been a significant decrease in refugees from the Democratic Republic of the Congo 16,; 7, , Bhutan 5,; 2, , and Eritrea 1,; 1, Iraq refugees comprised Therefore, the count of admissions exceeds the number of individuals arriving.

The number of nonimmigrant admissions does not equal the number of nonimmigrant visas issued by overseas consulates. The number of nonimmigrants arriving in the United States does not match the number of nonimmigrant visas issued by overseas consulates in the same fiscal year. Three main reasons account for this difference.

CRS: U.S. Immigration Policy on Temporary Admissions, January 15, - WikiLeaks

First, not all foreign nationals need a visa to enter the country. As of , nationals of 37 countries that are part of the Visa Waiver Program including most European Union countries, Australia, Brunei, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan can travel to the United States without a visa if they come for a period of less than 90 days as tourists or business travelers.


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Second, most nonimmigrant visas are valid for several years. And third, some people may choose not to travel to the United States even if they obtain a visa, or they may choose to travel in the next fiscal year. Recent presidential initiatives will increase the nonimmigrant flows in the near future. The Obama administration in January announced plans to boost tourism and travel to the United States by speeding up visa processing for China and Brazil two countries with a growing middle class , eliminating interviews for qualified visitors who wish to renew their visas to the United States, and expanding eligible country membership in the Visa Waiver Program.

Accessibility links

Nine countries have been added to the program since November During , there were Two groups account for these nonimmigrant admissions: Canadians who travel to the United States for business or pleasure, and Mexicans who possess a Nonresident Alien Border Crossing Card i. DHS only reports characteristics of I nonimmigrant admissions. The total number of I nonimmigrant admissions to the United States increased by 58 percent, from Temporary admissions of I nonimmigrants to the United States nearly tripled from Total temporary admissions of I nonimmigrants increased from The total count of I nonimmigrant admissions in and is higher than in previous years.

The increase is largely due to the addition of technology systems that now record some land admissions along both borders that were previously excluded from the I data collection. Readers are encouraged to exercise caution when interpreting recent trends in nonimmigrant admissions. For more details, click here.

5 changes in U.S. immigration policy that will affect immigrants in 2019

I nonimmigrant admissions decreased by 8 percent between and Admissions dropped from Most of this occurred due to a decline in the two largest admission categories: tourist and business visitor admissions, which decreased by 6 percent and 22 percent, respectively. In contrast, the admissions of academic students on F visas increased by 4 percent during that time.

Shortcuts to Immigration: The 'Temporary' Visa Program Is Broken

A number of factors caused the 15 percent drop in nonimmigrant admissions between However, the upward trend resumed after In , approximately 87 percent of nonimmigrant admissions were temporary visitors tourists and business travelers. As in previous years, temporary visitors accounted for an overwhelming majority of all arrivals. In , they represented 87 percent 46 million of all admissions to the United States see Figure 2. Of those,